sassafras

dragon-in-a-fez:

sassykardashian:

IF YOU EVER GET IN A FIGHT WITH YOUR SIGNIFICANT OTHER JUST BREATHE IN THE HELIUM OUT OF A BALLOON AND HAVE AN ARGUMENT AND THE FIRST ONE TO LAUGH LOSES

you just put every marriage counsellor out of business

americanapparel:

Heathers (1988)

americanapparel:

Heathers (1988)

asylum-art:

Wisteria bonsai proves big beauty comes in small packages-DDN Japan

As you probably already know, bonsai is the Japanese art of growing miniature trees or shrubs in planters. You’ve may have already seen at least some tiny potted junipers, a common species for bonsai, at some point, but actually many different species are suitable for bonsai, including some flowering trees like wisteria, or fuji in Japanese.

a simplified guide to sexualities
homosexual: sexually attracted to homer simpson
pansexual: gets off to various kitchen utensils
asexual: gets turned on by the first letter of the latin alphabet
demisexual: sexually attracted to you if and only if your blood is half divine
bisexual: can only have sex with two people ever. choose wisely
heterosexual: can only be satisfied by macklemore

mcfairy:

if cicadas can sleep for 17 years and then wake up only to scream and fuck so can i

1337tattoos:

instagram: holli.childs

1337tattoos:

instagram: holli.childs

angielovesmetoo:

theblindniggasamurai:

Underboob tats are dangerously attractive to me

I need to get me some underboob tats. STAT.

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman, doing domestic work, and working as a madam. During the last decade of her life, she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved.

After marrying her second husband, soldier Reuben Anderson, in Oxnard, California, in 1944, local authorities discovered that she was assigned male at birth. The couple was charged with perjury for marrying despite their both being legally male, resulting in ten years of probation. Standing up to the charges against her, Anderson said, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Years later, Anderson and her husband were charged again, this time with fraud after she received federal money reserved for military spouses. Both went to prison and were banned from Oxnard upon their release.

Lucy Hicks Anderson spent the remainder of her life in Los Angeles until her death in 1954, at age 68, leaving behind a legacy of authenticity and determination in the face of unjust laws.


5 Black Trans Women who Paved the Way — Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition